Seaside Ghost Town: The Abandoned Millionaire’s Resort


19th Jul, 2012


St. Tropez, Miami Beach, the Bahamas; imagine if the world’s most glamorous seaside resorts were abandoned overnight; the luxury hotels emptied of their guests and left to slowly decay, the boutiques, bars and nightclubs reclaimed by nature, sunbathers replaced by sea turtles nesting on the deserted beaches and the once vibrant holiday spirit silenced; nothing more than a whisper in the wind.


(c) Canissahun



On the western coast of the island of Cyprus in the Mediterranean sea, such a place exists. This is the story of Varosha, once regarded as one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations during the early 1970s, surrounded by turquoise blue waters and white sandy beaches, it was enjoyed by millionaires and movie stars such as Brigitte Bardot and Elizabeth Taylor, who were regular guests at the grand high rise hotels.



Varosha was home to over 39,000 residents but today the holiday town is completely fenced off, forbidding anyone from entering. No tourists roam the streets except for the rare brave explorer who dares find a way in.


via Sometimes Interesting

In the summer of 1974, without warning and in the middle of the highest season for tourists, Varosha fell victim to the ongoing war between the Greeks and the Turks. A full-scale Turkish invasion took place with air strikes and ground forces.


While the seaside resort was being bombed and buildings toppled, tourists and residents were fleeing their homes and hotel rooms, leaving behind everything, never to return. The Turkish military quickly gained control and began to seal off the area with patrolled fences, banning anyone and everyone except Turkish military or UN personnel.


Varosha’s reputation as one of the most idyllic holiday destinations was destroyed overnight. Over thirty years later, the sun still shines on the once bustling luxury shopping boulevard and the waves still stroke the sands of the old beach clubs but Varosha remains desolate.


Street in Verosha before and after

Bursting with nature’s overgrowth, the only humans to walk Varosha’s streets are the occasional Turkish soldiers on routine patrols looking for trespassers. They are authorized to imprison or even execute anyone they may find. For this reason, photographs of Varosha are rare to come by.


The photographs of those who have ventured over the fences, such as these, courtesy of Sometimes Interesting, are unlike most of the derelict photography we often see of abandoned places such as the dark and dismal aftermath of Tchernobyl or poverty-stricken neighborhoods of Detroit. Varosha’s remains are bathed in sunlight and what is left behind shows a place that was thriving and full of joy when it’s soul was snatched away.




Homes are still filled with residents’ furniture and clothes, tables are still set for dinner. A Swedish journalist who visited the town with the Swedish UN battalion in 1977 said he saw laundry still hanging and light bulbs still burning through windows in buildings.



A construction crane still appears in Varosha’s skyline above a new hotel that it never finished building. Car dealerships still house brand new cars straight out of the factory from the year of invasion; like automotive time capsules. The whole town is literally one big sun-drenched time capsule.

You can’t help but be baffled at how such a place has been allowed to rot for almost 40 years. There is no simple explanation, but I’m going to leave the political history behind the Greek and Turkish conflict (which goes back for centuries) for a rainy day. In a nutshell, Varosha’s neglect is a case of ‘if I can’t have it, then nobody can’. A UN resolution in 1984 ruled that Varosha should only be resettled by the original inhabitants who lived there before the invasion. This prevented Turkey from re-opening the resort but they never gave it back to the Greeks. Why hold on to a ghost town? The Turkish government probably figure it could come in useful one day as a political bargaining tool.

But even if, by some unexpected act of rational behavior, an agreement was to be reached, Varosha is now a big old mess. The buildings have been left to decay for so long that experts say the entire town would have to be demolished in order to rebuild and bring people back– a very costly revival that no one is in any great haste to undertake. Nature’s elements have been very busy since 1974 and they are the only true rulers of Varosha today.


Images via Sometimes Interesting

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