13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. XXVIII)

By

1st Jul, 2013

1. The Last House on Holland Island

“Built in 1888, this Victorian home from a different era has braved the elements and fought shoreline erosion on Holland Island in Chesapeake Bay for well over a century. Despite former resident and owner Stephen White’s best efforts to save the house and protect the island, the waters would overcome both and erase them from the map…” More on Sometimes-Interesting.

 

2. Typewriters of famous authors

Found on The Paris Review 

 

 

3. The NYC Rooftop Airport that Never was

NYC’s “Dream Airport” would “bring air service right into the heart of New York City and eliminate the necessity of limousine travel to and from existing airports,” LIFE reported in 1946. Find out more on Untapped Cities

 

4. The Museum of prosciutto di Parma

More info here found on Atlas Obscura

 

 

5. Gertrude Stein’s Rejection Letter from her Publisher, 1912

A rejection letter from London publisher, Alfred C. Fifield, mocking her style of prose. The manuscript, The Making of Americans: Being a History of a Family’s Progress was in fact later published in 1925. Found on Letters of Note

6. The Coqui Coqui Empire Of Senses In Yucatán, Mexico

A boutique hotel on the Yucatán Peninsula in Southeastern Mexico, more on Yatzer

 

7. Hidden behind the paint of a house’s basement in Bristol

Found on Imgur

 

8. Upcycled Winebox Ottoman stools

Found, available to buy on Etsy

 

9. A Postal worker shared this on Reddit

Found on Reddit 

 

 10. Miss Atomic Bomb, circa 1957

Copa Room showgirl Lee Merlin, crowned “Miss Atomic Bomb 1957.”

Nevada became the center of the nation’s eye during the 1950s after President Harry S. Truman authorized a 680-square mile section of the Nellis Air Force Gunnery and Bombing Range for nuclear bomb testing. As each atomic blast lit up the Nevada scenery public interest increased. So much so that Americans around the country witnessed the first televised atomic blast in 1952. Atomic bomb fever began to infiltrate every aspect of society, from household goods to football teams naming themselves the “Atoms.”

Found on History by Zim

 

11. Why Don’t we Do it in the Road

A lyrical portrait of one of London’s most peculiar tourist attractions – a humble pedestrian crossing in St John’s Wood…

 

12. Somebody’s House

The 17th-century Spanish home of sculptor Xavier Corbero from Somewhere I would like to live found on Kateoplis

 

13. Just a Tree growing in a Car

Found on reddit

:::

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